General CBF

Short Term Mission Trips and the Migrant Caravan

By Chris Ellis

Every year millions of Americans go on short-term mission (STM) trips across the globe. They go with desires to help and serve those, who they perceive, that are in need of their help.

Did you know that in 2007 the top destinations for megachurch STM trips were: Mexico, Guatemala, and Honduras?

If you broaden that out to all U.S. churches, Honduras is 5th and Guatemala is 6th. Furthermore, 59% of all STM trips are to Latin America. On these trips, churches were built, people were fed and buildings were painted (for the 4th time every summer, probably). Currently, researchers estimate that there are almost 2 million STM participants per year. Many of those statistics are from 2007 and 2013, but due to a variety of factors, they haven’t changed much (language, ease of access, trip length, etc..). That means since 2007, there have probably been over 22 million Christians who have been on a STM trip with almost 13 million of them going to Latin America.

13 million. That’s a lot of U.S. Christians getting to make friends with people who are currently walking to the U.S. border with babies, grandmas, and what few material possessions they have. People who are literally walking for their lives.

Walking from gangs, drugs, poverty and death at an unnatural early age. I wonder if any of those walking shared communion, or a meal of empanadas on the last night with a U.S. Christian on a STM trip? You know, the one where hugs are passed around and comments of “I’ll never forget you or this trip” are emotionally expressed.

I wonder if any of those walking worked beside STM participants as they built a church, dug a well or held a medical clinic?

I wonder where those 13 million participants are now when their voices and action are most needed. I wonder what they’re thinking when these Christ-bearers from Central America whom they have spent time visiting are walking for months to save their lives. I wonder what they are thinking when they hear inflammatory rhetoric calling them an invading horde. I wonder what they’re thinking when the news finds an immigrant who has committed a crime and holds that criminal up as an archetype of all those walking to save their lives. I wonder what they’re thinking when troops are being sent to the border to harden it against mothers, fathers and children who plan on lawfully presenting themselves at the U.S. border as asylum seekers, as is the only way to apply for asylum in the U.S.

I have to wonder, because I’m not hearing anything and what I do hear makes me question everything.

I would have thought those who have crossed paths with those from Latin America would be pushing back against the dehumanization of people being called ‘animals’ and ‘invaders.’ I would have thought they would be financially supporting groups that are helping to provide for the needs of those in the caravan. I would have thought they would be advocating for more judges and translators to be sent to the border to process asylum claims quicker. Sadly, these things aren’t happening, and that says a lot about the role of STM trips to actually change lives and produce disciples who care about the plight of those whom they served.

If you’ve been on a STM trip to Latin America in the past 10 years, I challenge you to view those in the caravan as people you might have shared a bit of your life with. Doing so will hopefully give you the needed perspective to truly care about these people, these image bearers worthy of the love of Christ and help from the church, and not as animals or an invading horde.

Chris Ellis serves as the minister of mission and outreach for Second Baptist Church in Little Rock, Ark., and is the chair of the CBF Missions Council. 

7 thoughts on “Short Term Mission Trips and the Migrant Caravan

  1. Give me a break. The VAST MAJORITY of them ( maybe ALL) are, not “walking to save their lives…we wouldn’t be DOING STM trips to these locations of there was that kind of instability, and you KNOW it! They are walking to try to steal their part of the American Dream…”steal” because they refuse to come in the LEGAL way. BTW..I myself have gone on FOUR STM trips, and would never have gone to ANY country so unstable that the populace “feared for their lives”…so STOP with this bleeding heart stuff!!

    • While I applaud your efforts in mission work I would encourage you to dig in beyond just your very limited exposure during mission trips to learn about real life in the countries mentioned. Mission trips are great experiences but rarely offer a real view into the daily lives of the people. Also, please be aware that applying for asylum upon arriving to the US is an entirely legal way to enter. They’re not stealing anything, they’re playing by our rules. But beyond rules given to us by the government the Gospel – in fact Jesus himself – tells us that anytime we deny food, water, shelter, healing, and community to even “the last of these” we deny Jesus himself. That standard is not met by STM alone. Shalom.

    • Laura, how can you be so sure they are not running for their lives? I hope your mission trips didn’t just happen to make you feel like you are “nice”. So many go on those just to fulfill their egoistic need of feeling like a good person, only to then go back to their comfortable and convenient life and say things like you just did. It seems like these trips didn’t open your eyes to see and I am so sorry about that. Please pray for these fellow human beings who need mercy and grace, just as much as you and I do!

    • Hey Laura – your hosts are not going to put their American visitors in harms way. But, if you have actually been on these trips you should know that they can be dangerous. And I hope you can entertain the thought that actually living there might be slightly different than your five day trip. There is a lot of violence in Central America. If you don’t know this, I encourage you to dig a little deeper.

      • Hi Laura, I believe most people will be running from dangerous situations. And as Rob mentions, asking for asylum is legal. But regardless of the reasons that move people to do this, or the ways they do it, it’s clear that they all are suffering and they all need help (of different kinds). Not condemnation or judgement. We need to allow the same love that moves us to engage in a missions trip to guide us as we read this situation. If our compassion is conditional, it is not compassion.

  2. Hi Laura, I believe most people will be running from dangerous situations. And as Rob mentions, asking for asylum is legal. But regardless of the reasons that move people to do this, or the ways they do it, it’s clear that they all are suffering and they all need help (of different kinds). Not condemnation or judgement. We need to allow the same love that moves us to engage in a missions trip to guide us as we read this situation. If our compassion is conditional, it is not compassion.

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